Nikon W300

So … after fusing over the Nikon W300 for many days, debating internally if I should buy it, holding it in my hand at the local Best Buy then walking away, driving to a discount electronics store 33 miles away in hopes of a cheaper price (they didn’t even stock the camera), I finally laid the cash on the counter in front of a disconnected Best Buy cashier and walked home (actually drove home) with camera in box.

Of course, the budget will take a five hundred dollar hit for a new camera and memory card and some will wonder why I need a new camera when the Nikon D600 is a perfect camera in many ways.

The point and shoot W300 is what I was looking for with all the features listed on the Nikon web site that will satisfy my desires and needs.

In the store, the camera box was trapped inside a huge plastic container the cashier had to open. The 128 gig ultra fast HD memory card was also in its own huge plastic container. Store security in effect yet there was no Best Buy employee to help me in my selection. Although I was already focused on the W300 it would have been pleasant to, at least, browse other cameras at the suggestion of a Best Buy camera expert.

That didn’t happen.

The Nikon W300 box. Photo taken by the iPhone.

The Nikon W300 box. Photo taken by the iPhone.

At home, the unboxing was a huge disappointment. The contents rattled inside the cardboard and the box looked like it had been opened before my purchase. The padded bag the camera was wrapped in wasn’t taped as if some had already handled my new W300.

I would not have bought the camera had I been able to actually hold the box in hand at the store, fearing the contents had been carelessly handled or actually opened and used before.

At first glance, I was happy with the thick paperback manual resting inside the box until I realized the manual was really a 20 page quick start-up guide printed in every language known to man.

Referencing a manual online,  I learned the time-lapse feature, which was the primary selling point for me, is limited to only 10 seconds. This was a huge let down and I battled a rush of buyer’s remorse at the lost of five bills for a camera that couldn’t perform as expected or advertised.

Of course, the battery was dead on arrival and it took over two hours to charge. When fully charged, it was time to leave for Sunday evening obligations and I couldn’t explore the wonders of my new toy. But not before I paired the W300 with the iPhone via a new Snap Talk application downloaded from the App Store.

 

The actual Nikon W300 Coolpix camera. The color looks red in this photo and in reality but the Nikon believes it is orange and if the light is just right it does look like orange.

The actual Nikon W300 Coolpix camera. The color looks red in this photo and in reality but the Nikon believes it is orange and if the light is just right it does look like orange. Photo taken by an iPhone.

Even with the dismal unboxing and initial misgiving, I am looking forward to using the W300 in future photographic exploits. In hand, the W300 is a solid camera and as a Nikon loyalist, the W300 will look good on the shelf if it turns into one of my impulse buys that I later wish I had researched better.

Please note, minimal calories were burned in pursuit of the Nikon W300.

 

 

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